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decreasing of salt in crude oil desalting

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Charles Randall 9 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2877

    Anonymous

    HI, EVERYBODY

    CAN WE DESALTING (NA & K) IN A REFINERY FOR OPTIMIZATION
    WITHOUT ANY DESALTER ,
    IF  YES,  HOW? 

  • #5923

    Charles Randall
    Participant

    I am not sure what your point would be in going around a Desalting Unit, makes no sense to me, since they conserve water use and maximize salt removal. Some desalters used in the Upgrading Units in Canada Syncrude production have tripple stage deslating in the same vessel (CE-NATCO?).
     
    A well functioning desalter unit is the heart of a delayed coking units effective operation and key to reaching design life goals.
    The advances in second stage & tripple stage desalting have been gatekeepers in fending off problems from extra-heavy non-conventional crudes that can form water-in-oil instead of oil-in-water emulsions (ie conducts current) and are increasing in TAN levels (the organic acids interupt the normal inorganic acid corrision process from sealing off metal attack).
     
    If you are a well meaning environmentalist type that is looking for “bugs to eat sulfur” type of green approach, forget I said looking at positive outcome from manufacturing process will be beyond your comprehension. If you are just too cheap to put the unit in ….. get over it and stop paying 4X it price in equipment replacement & operating problems.
    Regards

  • #5922

    Charles Randall
    Participant

    <A timely NACE article on corrosion cost & fact that it can come from many sources….. a great deal of which are water soluble and often removed with salts/water/emulsion layers in desalter) CER>
    Battling Corrosion In Refineries
    November 17, 2009


    Corrosion in refinery operations has been, and still is, the subject of many studies, papers, courses and web forums. Although a lot of what has been written shows that significant progress in understanding corrosion has been made, it also makes it clear that the problem continues to exist and that quite possibly is getting worse.
    It is estimated that the global costs of refinery corrosion are in the order of 15B USD annually. Getting more exact numbers is not possible as refineries do not make available the extent of their corrosion problems, which is understandable considering the ever increasing environmental legislation they face. It is worth mentioning that in these costs, profit losses and loss of production uptime have not been taken into account. An analysis report by NACE International states that in the USA alone annual profit losses due to refinery corrosion may be as high as 12B USD!
    Despite extensive research and vast amounts of available literature, many of the corrosion mechanisms are not yet fully understood. The problem with petroleum refining is that there is not one single source of corrosion, but many. To add to the problem, some of the corrodents might interact and increase or inhibit each other’s corrosivity. Also, physical process conditions play a role; so temperature, flow and Reynolds number have to be taken into account too.
    SOURCE: NACE

  • #5913

    Anonymous

      HI, CHARLIE
     
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR REPLY
    ACTUALLY, WE HAVE 2 SAMPLES OF CPC WHICH ONE OF THEM HAVE HIGH SULPHUR AND OTHER
    IN THE MAX RANGE OF WORLD , NOW WE WANT TO USE OF THE BLEND OF THESE TOW SAMPLES
    IN THE ALUMINUM INDUSTRIES .
    IN FACT WE WANT TO NOW THE BLEND PERCENTAGE OF THESE TOW SAMPLES.
    DO WE UNDERSTAND THIS PERCENTAGE AS PER TRUE-FALSE TEST OR NOT  ?
     
     
     BEST REGARDS,
     
     
     
     Ghahhary
     

  • #5912

    Charles Randall
    Participant

    Mr Ghahhary,
     
    I am not sure how we jumped from decreasing salt in crude to you trying to blend two types high sulfur petcoke and make CPC for the Aluminum Industry, but its way off topic.
     
    I also am not sure what your asking about True-False test, Blend percentages or what makes you think that any high sulfur petcoke could meet Aluminum Industry anode specifications – the sulfur and metals are usually too high, and there is usually some percentage of shot that would become dust upon crushing to make anodes. 
     
    This isn’t the blogg to answer those type of questions – you should talk to someone in merchant calcining industry or one of the experts in the CPC and Aluminum industry like CRU or Jacobs.
    Regards
     
     

  • #5911

    ali ghahhary
    Member

      Thanks Alot Dear Charles
       May I Ask You To Give Me The CRU  Information ?
     
     
      Kind Regards,
      Ghahhary
     

  • #5910

    Charles Randall
    Participant

    Gorbesia,
    Sure the website for CRU Group & Consultancy is @ http://crugroup.com/AboutCRU/Pages/default.aspx
    and the best contact would probably be Calvin Graham who is in charge of Raw Materials (like Petcoke/CPC, & Pitch)
    Calvin.Graham@crugroup.com
     
    Although most of thier info is around the various Metals industry (especially Aluminium) but under “CRU Reports” heading look at “Bi-Monthly” and it shows “Carbon Products Monitor” which addresses CPC, Anodes & Coal Tar Pitch for Aluminum and Ferro Alloy applications.  I did not see it here but I know they put out a 5year Forecast on Carbon Market in 2009 and it covers a lot of detail.
     
    Regards

  • #5909

    ali ghahhary
    Member

      hi,
     
      thank so much Charlie Randall
     
     
    gorbesia

  • #4990

    Anonymous

    GOOD AFTERNOON MR.CHARLIE. PLEASE I SAW YOUR WRITE ON LINE, I AM AM UNDERGRADUATE IN NIGERIA. CAN U SEND ME MORE ON SALT IN CRUDE
    AND DESALTING APPROACHES FROM YOUR WEALTH OF KNOWLEDGE. IT WILL BOOST MY PROJECT IN SCHOOL.
    MY EMAIL IS worldintegrity@yahoo.com
    Thanks.

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