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Coke behavior in very cold climates

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #1702

    Anonymous

    Hi all:
     
    I am new to this forum, and I would first like to introduce myself.
    I work in a company that designs and manufactures special cranes for various sectors, including for cokers.  Until now we have always designed cranes for moderate temperature countries, but lately we are starting to work on projects for very cold countries with low temperatures of -40 ° C.  Therefore I wanted to ask you who have experience working at these temperatures the following questions:
    – The first thing I want to confirm is that at these temperatures the coke process does not stop, and continues to operate?
    – Is the water freezing in the pit / pad, or take enough time to make the dewatering?
    – When the coke is poured into the hopper, is the coke frozen or not?
    – After going through the hopper and crusher, in the area where it is stored (usually covered)  is the coke frozen?
    – Is it advisable to heat the rails the Crane is traveling on?
    Thanks for your help
     
    Eduardo Francés
     

  • #4500

    Anonymous

    Eduardo – 
     
    Welcome to the Coking.com and Refining Community Universe!
     
    To address some of your questions….
    1. Yes, the coker stays operating in very cold (-40C or F, it’s the same!)
    2. The water typically does not freeze in the maze and water circulation system but can freeze in a pit or on the pad if left stangant for any period of time. 
    3. The coke is quite hot when it comes out of the drum and sometimes can catch on fire even.  So it typically is still “warm” when it is put into the hopper but the coke handling operators have to move it fast because it can turn into a solid mass.  But even when it gets hard, the loaders or cranes can break it apart easily. 
    4. Storage piles are typically uncovered (canada) so the coke turns solid.  Some sites use a chemical antifreeze agent (the exact solution escapes me right now) to prevent the solid pile turning into a mass for example in rail cars.  
    5. I’m not sure.  I would depend on how frequently the crane runs.  If it sits for long periods of time, a thawing head on the wheels might be nice. 
     
    Hope this helps. 

  • #4499

    Anonymous

    Eduardo – 
     
    Welcome to the Coking.com and Refining Community Universe!
     
    To address some of your questions….
    1. Yes, the coker stays operating in very cold (-40C or F, it’s the same!)
    2. The water typically does not freeze in the maze and water circulation system but can freeze in a pit or on the pad if left stangant for any period of time. 
    3. The coke is quite hot when it comes out of the drum and sometimes can catch on fire even.  So it typically is still “warm” when it is put into the hopper but the coke handling operators have to move it fast because it can turn into a solid mass.  But even when it gets hard, the loaders or cranes can break it apart easily. 
    4. Storage piles are typically uncovered (canada) so the coke turns solid.  Some sites use a chemical antifreeze agent (the exact solution escapes me right now) to prevent the solid pile turning into a mass for example in rail cars.  
    5. I’m not sure.  I would depend on how frequently the crane runs.  If it sits for long periods of time, a thawing head on the wheels might be nice. 
     
    Hope this helps. 

  • #4498

    Anonymous

    Dear Evan:
    Thanks for your time and consideration .
    The first thing I want to tell you  is that so far I have been able to answer because I have the impression that my system does not work well because each time I leave the page, the password is invalid and I have to start the process for a new password.
     I  not sure if this happens to someone, or is only my problem.
    In relation to the frequency of use of the crane, is quite high, in fact 1 it is working  6 hours/day normally and according to the number of coke drum, it  may not have too much time on stop.
    T-40C, the water vapor condenses on metal surfaces instantly and  I suppose that accumulates ice quickly, despite the fact that the design of our cranes for  safety reason  includes all-wheel drive.
     When e is Ice on the rails,  it is lose braking and acceleration, and that in addition to affect the average unloading, also a major security problem, since the crane is not going to brake or accelerate in space originally planned, and I could hit violently against the end runway.
     
    Regars 
     
    Eduardo
     
     

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