Lessons Learned: Transfer Line Erosion and Coke Ignition

Presented By

Conference: Galveston 2017

Part 1:
On a delayed coker, the pipe between the outlet of the furnace and the switch valve is called the Transfer Line. Over time, coke will accumulate in this pipe. Removal of the coke is typically done using hydroblasting from the cleanout flanges at various points in the transfer line. Porous coke can retain unconverted hydrocarbons and can remain hot due to its insulating properties. The presentation will share an incident where coke ignited during the cleaning process. The goal of the presentation is the provide awareness of this risk and share prevention measures that were put in place following the incident.

Part 2:
On a delayed coker, the pipe between the outlet of the furnace and the switch valve is called the Transfer Line. Over time, coke will accumulate in this pipe. The accumulation reduces the flow area thereby increasing the velocity at a given flow rate. Higher velocity increases the erosion of the pipe especially at the elbows. The presentation will share recent inspection results where accelerated erosion was found. The goal of the presentation will be the share the findings so that other refiners can ensure their inspection programs cover this scenario, reducing the risk of loss of containment.

Refining Community